Recent Stories

woman stands outside with grass and trees in the background

U101 instructor of the year calls on lifetime of experiences to guide students

July 24, 2024, Page Ivey

Kitty Sutton began her professional life as an attorney and thinks the lawyerly ability to hear a person’s story without passing judgment is part of what makes her successful as a University 101 instructor. In fact, her students were so impressed with Sutton’s skills that she is the 2024 recipient of the M. Stuart Hunter Award for Outstanding Teaching in University 101.

portrait of Kimberly Rogers

Honors College alumna finds success in higher education

May 29, 2024, Kathryn McPhail

Honors College alumna Kimberly Rogers recently completed her first year as a college president — an impressive achievement for anyone, especially a first-generation university graduate. She took the first steps on that path in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where she discovered a passion that would lead her far.

Woman outdoors on ship

Support and passion bring Honors College alumna into the 'ocean twilight zone'

May 22, 2024, Kathryn McPhail

Honors College alumna Kayla Gardner’s passion for protecting the ocean and teaching others to do the same led her to pursue a career in marine science. Unlike many young people who are drawn to dolphins, turtles or sharks, much smaller creatures sparked Gardner’s interest.

Kellie Martin holding a bottle of wine and a glass of wine.

Honors College alumna teaches about the beauty of wine

May 08, 2024, Téa Smith

Kellie Martin thought once she completed her international studies degree, she’d become a foreign service officer, but that never happened. During her studies, she developed an interest in wine and that changed the trajectory of her career. Now, she teaches people the ins and outs of wine as the owner and chief sommelier of the Colorado-based SommSchool.

Satellite image of an Atlantic hurricane

2024 hurricane faculty experts list

May 01, 2024, Laura Morris

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1. Researchers at the University of South Carolina are available to discuss multiple aspects of the 2024 hurricane season, including preparation and communication, environmental impact and historical perspectives.

Group of students in graduation cap and gowns posing for a photo.

Class of 2024

April 25, 2024, Megan Sexton

As the Class of 2024 prepares to walk across the commencement stage, graduates leave the University of South Carolina with memories of enduring friendships, newfound passions, supportive mentors and life-changing experiences.

Carol Harrison smiles outside on USC's campus

Double honor: USC historian lands Guggenheim Fellowship, Rome Prize

April 25, 2024, Laura Erskine

Carol Harrison is headed to Rome for the upcoming school year thanks to two major fellowships supporting her research on the First Vatican Council (1869-1870). A professor in USC’s Department of History, Harrison recently won both the Guggenheim Fellowship — one of the world’s most prestigious grants for scholars — and the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

Multiple black and white  scans of a brain with red highlights.

Autism-related research part of wide-ranging USC focus on neuroscience

April 24, 2024, Communications and Marketing

The University of South Carolina is focused on the brain. From autism and aphasia to Alzheimer’s and other related dementias, university researchers are working across several academic disciplines to better understand how the brain works and to develop solutions that will improve people’s health.

head and shoulders image of a man

Sullivan Award winner plans to continue volunteerism as physician

April 18, 2024, Communications and Marketing

Edgar Lemus Rivera plans to continue his dedication to volunteerism and service as he works his way through medical school to become a physician. The biochemistry and molecular biology major from Toms River, New Jersey, is one of two winners of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award — the university’s highest student honor.

two women talk while looking at posters

Exploring the world of research at Discover USC

April 11, 2024, Communications and Marketing

Each year, Discover USC showcases the wide-ranging research being done by University of South Carolina students and postdocs. From health science to humanities and AI to public health, USC scholars — including undergraduate and graduate students, medical scholars and postdocs — are working with faculty mentors and others to explore topics that interest them, learn more about research skills and work on how to present their findings to an audience.

four squares with images and icons representing cool classes for Fall 2024

Cool Classes Fall 2024

April 07, 2024, Erin Newman

We're back again for another year and another round of some of the coolest classes you can take for Fall 2024. For this list, we've brought back fan favorites and added some new classes that are sure to make you say, "I want to take that!" There are a ton of unique learning experiences waiting to be uncovered. Whether you’re into sports, true crime, dancing, cooking or even something a little otherworldly, South Carolina has you covered.

Icon of how an artificial intelligence brain connects to concepts of technology, transportation, vision, the brain, ideas and health care.

2024 artificial intelligence faculty experts list

April 03, 2024, Gregory Hardy

University of South Carolina researchers explore how artificial intelligence can be used for advancements in health care, education, manufacturing, energy, disaster management and transportation. They are also helping shape and inform the ethics and policies surrounding these emergent solutions.

MInuette Floyd poses with students and teachers in front of a school library in Ghana.

USC professor wins governor's award for arts in education

March 28, 2024, Thom Harman

Minuette Floyd, a professor of art education in the University of South Carolina’s School of Visual Art and Design, won a governor’s award in the arts in education category. The award, announced by the South Carolina Arts Commission on behalf of the sitting governor, is the state’s highest award for exceptional achievement in practicing or supporting the arts.

Gates to Horseshoe of USC campus

2024 Autism Acceptance Month: USC faculty experts list

March 28, 2024, Gregory Hardy

April is Autism Acceptance Month. The CDC estimates that 1 out of every 36 eight-year-olds is affected by autism, a lifelong developmental disorder. As South Carolina’s leader in health sciences, USC has researchers across disciplines who specialize in autism.

A photo of a group of colorful rubberbands isolated on a white background.

Ring polymer research points way to new industrial and biomedical applications

March 06, 2024, Chris Horn

Imagine smartphones that bend, twist and stretch like rubber. Or 3D-printed material that mimics the pliable characteristics of human cartilage found in knees, noses and ears. It’s not much of a stretch for Ting Ge, an assistant professor in chemistry and biochemistry who has just begun a five-year CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation to delve deeper into the field of ring polymers.

An illustration of a robot arm handing a Rubiks cube to a human hand.

From agribusiness to health care to flood management, artificial intelligence research clicks into place

March 01, 2024, Rebekah Friedman

Artificial intelligence is making plenty of headlines these days — and, in some cases, even writing them. Some concerns are valid, some are overblown, but as the global economy embraces the emerging technology, there’s no avoiding the larger conversation. There’s also no denying AI’s real-world potential. For every Sports Illustrated byline scandal or news story about the danger of self-driving cars, there’s an untold story of how AI research promises to change our world for the better, and a lot of that research is happening right here at the University of South Carolina.

Students perform during summer conservatory

USC youth summer camps 2024

March 01, 2024, Communications and Marketing

With only a few short months until summer, it’s time for parents to find summer activities for their children. USC offers a wide variety of summer camps for all ages and all interests from music to soccer, dance and engineering.

two people stand in front of beer vats

Alumni couple use 'complementary skillset' to create thriving taproom

February 26, 2024, Page Ivey

Brian and Nicole Cendrowski spent more than a decade dreaming of opening their own brewery before settling on a plan and a location. Their Fireforge Brewery & Taproom in downtown Greenville weathered the pandemic and is now a thriving member of the Upstate community they call home.

a person points at a scan on a computer screen

Improving care in the Stroke Belt

February 19, 2024, Communications and Marketing

As the state’s flagship institution, the University of South Carolina is well has many strengths in both research and treatment of stroke and aphasia — a common consequence of stroke characterized by difficulty speaking or understanding others’ speech. The research is critically important in the state with the seventh-highest incidence of stroke mortality in the U.S.

Stevie Malenowski combs through a box of papers and images in Thomas Cooper Library.

USC students bring untold history of Sumter, S.C., to the public

January 31, 2024, Laura Erskine

Public history student Stevie Malenowski spent his summer digitizing images from boxes of archival materials, uncovering the history of the Williams Furniture Company, a staple of Sumter, South Carolina, for decades, alongside specialists at University Libraries. The archival materials are a key resource for a traveling exhibit coming in 2024.

A portrait of Leroy Chapman.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution editor-in-chief Leroy Chapman inspires next generation of journalists

January 22, 2024, Craig Brandhorst

In March 2023, University of South Carolina alumnus Leroy Chapman Jr. made headlines — as the first person of color to be named editor-in-chief of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It was a big deal for the 155-year-old paper, for the city of Atlanta and for journalism in general. It was also a big deal for Chapman’s alma mater, which recognized his professional achievements with the 2023 College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Award.

Graduation cap decorated with a Block C.

Class of 2023 December graduates

December 07, 2023, Megan Sexton

As the December Class of 2023 prepares to walk across the commencement stage, graduates leave the University of South Carolina with memories of enduring friendships, newfound passions, supportive mentors and life-changing experiences.

map of the ocean area south of massachusetts near the nantucket shoals

As the US begins to build offshore wind farms, scientists say many questions remain about impacts on the oceans and marine life

December 01, 2023, Erin L. Meyer-Gutbrod

As renewable energy production expands across the U.S., the environmental impacts of these new sources are receiving increased attention. The Conversation asked USC marine scientist Erin L. Meyer-Gutbrod and others to explain the key findings of a recent report on how offshore wind farms in the Nantucket Shoals region could affect critically endangered North Atlantic right whales.

Wendy Lower, author of “The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed”

Henry and Sylvia Yaschik Foundation supports conversation about Jewish history

November 07, 2023, Rebekah Friedman

In the spring, audiences at USC had the chance to learn more about Jewish history from award-winning author and Holocaust expert Wendy Lower. Her weeklong fellowship with the university’s Jewish studies program was made possible by a generous gift from the Henry and Sylvia Yaschik Foundation.

Photo of student walking on the Horseshoe

First-generation college students bring resilience, perspectives to USC campus

November 03, 2023, Megan Sexton

First-generation college students come from all sorts of backgrounds and bring a variety of perspectives to campus. At USC, about one-fifth of the student population identifies as first-generation college students, meaning their parents did not earn a four-year college degree.

Close up of yellow leaves of a tree against a sky background.

50-year partnership powers humanities in South Carolina

October 16, 2023, Bryan Gentry

In the early 1970s, a USC administrator helped organize a committee to manage funds for humanities-related projects in South Carolina. That small step led to a 50-year relationship between the university and South Carolina Humanities, a statewide nonprofit that works to enrich the cultural and intellectual lives of South Carolinians. This month, SC Humanities honors four USC-affiliated faculty and former faculty members.

a jockey on horseback waves as two men walk beside the horse

History professor documents Latino excellence in horseracing

October 12, 2023, Page Ivey

The next time you watch a horse race, note the accents in the voices, read the names — not just the jockeys and grooms, but the trainers and owners. Chances are most of the people you see excelling in horseracing are Latino. “Over 80% of the people on the track throughout the second half of the 20th and into the 21st century are Latino,” says University of South Carolina history professor Gabrielle Kuenzli.

Wrought iron Horseshoe gates

Latino/a and Hispanic Faculty Caucus fosters unity, embraces differences

October 11, 2023, Hannah Cambre

The Latino/a and Hispanic Faculty Caucus is a group of faculty members united by shared heritages and focused on advocacy initiatives to recruit, retain and better support the various needs of Latino and Hispanic faculty members.

April Hiscox smiles in front of a tree.

Michael J. Mungo Award winner April Hiscox

October 06, 2023, Téa Smith

Geography professor April Hiscox wants her students to really understand the material she is teaching, so she encourages them to show what they’ve learned in very creative ways, like making a quilt, creating a board game or even singing a song. For her inventive teaching practices, Hiscox has received a 2023 Michael J. Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Kate Levey headshot

Digital certificate program offers in-demand career skills

September 14, 2023, Hannah Cambre

This fall, the university launched its digital studies certificate program, which helps undergraduate students gain in-demand digital skills. The certificate is the first in a series of anticipated interdisciplinary programs that are set to roll out in the spring of 2024.

USC Cocky Statue

ICYMI: Ten big things happening at the university

August 30, 2023, Lauryn Jiles

The university never sleeps, but it does slow down a bit during the summer. With the start of the fall semester, here’s a reminder of some recent happenings that you might have missed, plus a heads up about some major upcoming events.

Gamecock alumni Casey Fissel dives in the tank at Riverbanks Zoo

USC graduates dive deep and discover dream careers at Riverbanks Zoo

August 23, 2023, Alexis Watts

Seven Gamecocks were on the frontlines of the March opening of the Darnall W. and Susan F. Boyd Aquarium & Reptile Conservation Center at Riverbanks Zoo & Garden. With degrees ranging from advertising and public relations to biology and marine science, these University of South Carolina graduates play important roles in powering the No. 1 tourist destination in South Carolina, which attracts more than 1 million visitors annually.

a man kneels on a boardwalk in a coastal marsh

From the classroom to the field, USC students carve their own Carolina paths

August 21, 2023

For a lot of University of South Carolina students, the realization that this is a special place comes quickly. One walk around the Horseshoe, one time cheering in the stands at Williams-Brice Stadium, and that’s all it takes. But those signature experiences are only a tiny part of what it means to be a Gamecock. Life-altering experiences can be found all over campus and beyond.

A portrait of Sara Barber with SC Statehouse in the background.

Sara Barber pushes long-term change in handling domestic violence cases

August 14, 2023, Rebekah Friedman

In South Carolina, 42 percent of women have experienced intimate partner physical violence, sexual violence or stalking. Sara Barber knows the statistics. Since 2014, the University of South Carolina alumna has served as executive director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, a coalition of 22 organizations that connect survivors with emergency shelter, counseling and other services.

Jared Johnson and Clint Wallace, two of the four owners of All Good Books.

Independent bookstore begins first chapter -- and USC's fingerprints are on every page

August 11, 2023, Megan Sexton

Walk through the doors at All Good Books, a thriving bookstore in the heart of Five Points, and you’ll see neat shelves filled with classics and new releases, a counter for coffee, beer and wine and – perhaps most important of all — a welcoming vibe.

A portrait of Audrey Ware.

Curiosity drives consulting career

August 10, 2023, Dan Cook

Curiosity has always been a driving force for Audrey Ware — and it has paid off. She earned three undergraduate degrees at USC: international business, marketing and French. Now, armed with a master’s degree in market research and consumer behavior, Ware continues to explore as a senior business analyst for the global firm McKinsey & Company in Charlotte.

Students wear protective glasses while learning at camp

Carolina Master Scholars camps spark curiosity, forge connections

August 03, 2023, Alexis Watts

Summer camp memories don’t often include crime scene blood spatter analysis or creating culinary masterpieces, but the Carolina Master Scholars Adventure Series is not your typical summer camp.

Josh Hughes sits on a horse with mountains in the background in Kyrgyzstan

Change of plans: A canceled study abroad trip leads to new career goals

July 21, 2023, Hannah Cambre

One week before Josh Hughes planned to study abroad in Ukraine, his trip was canceled because of the escalating conflict with Russia. He was disappointed-- until a new opportunity arose in Kyrgyzstan. Now, he's returned to his host country on a Critical Language scholarship.

a radar image of hurricane hugo making landfall in SC in 1989

USC geography graduates help guide state, nation through hurricane season

July 13, 2023, Page Ivey

Every summer, the South Carolina coast and the southeastern U.S. faces the threat of hurricanes that range in size from sustained winds of 74 mph to the state’s most catastrophic hurricane, Hugo in 1989 that resulted in $10 billion in damages. Helping minimize the damage from these storms is the job of several graduates of the University of South Carolina’s geography master’s program.

U.S. passports on a table with paper clips

USC staff sign on for study abroad

July 06, 2023, Rebekah Friedman

Each year, close to 2,000 University of South Carolina undergrads venture overseas for once-in-a-lifetime educational opportunities. And behind the scenes, staff members are there to navigate new terrain, keep schedules running smoothly and provide emotional support when students feel stressed. USC TIMES sat down with five of them to learn more about what they do.

Animals that shared the landscape with humans disappeared as the ice age ended. Mauricio Antón/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY

Forensic evidence suggests Paleo-Americans hunted mastodons, mammoths and other megafauna in eastern North America 13,000 years ago

June 14, 2023, Christopher R. Moore

The earliest people who lived in North America shared the landscape with huge animals. On any day these hunter-gatherers might encounter a giant, snarling saber-toothed cat ready to pounce, or a group of elephantlike mammoths stripping tree branches. Maybe a herd of giant bison would stampede past.

Frank Avignone poses in lab with a white lap coat on.

Physicist continues lifelong search for dark matter, 90 years in the making

June 13, 2023, Bryan Gentry

Frank Avignone is looking for dark matter ― the mysterious substance that makes up much of the universe. In a lab at the University of South Carolina, he shows off a spectrometer that he recently repaired with support from the National Science Foundation. Purchased for his lab more than 50 years ago, the device proved to be just what he needs for his newest experiment.

The Owen family of three young boys holding their infant brother

Clay and Grainne Owen lead Gamecocks in support of curing children's cancer

June 07, 2023, Megan Sexton

When Clay and Grainne Owen’s son Killian died of leukemia at age 9, the family’s tragedy became their mission — to find better treatments and make childhood cancer a curable disease. Their charity, Curing Kids Cancer, has raised more than $25 million since 2005.

Terence Weik at the Kinsler cemetery site in Blythewood, S.C.

USC researcher's Black cemeteries project aims to restore lost ancestral connections

June 07, 2023, Rose Cisneros

For Terrance Weik, the gravesite of his great-grandmother was a sacred place: Her headstone memorialized a place where he could remember her and those who came before. Weik is working on research and preservation efforts at three burial grounds across South Carolina: sites in Blythewood, Daufuskie Island and Hilton Head.

Steve Benjamin on the USC Horseshoe

Former Columbia mayor ready for White House gig

June 02, 2023, Page Ivey

Steve Benjamin, former mayor of Columbia and two-time graduate of USC, is director of the Office of Public Engagement and a senior adviser to the president and the White House. Benjamin sat down with USC Today earlier this year to discuss the job and how his experiences as a political science major and law school student prepared him for his 12 years as Columbia mayor and for his new role in the White House.

A linear grey geometric pattern with a linear hexagon as the focal point.

Saskia Coenen Snyder explores the role of Jews in the late 19th century diamond trade.

May 22, 2023, Q&A by Craig Brandhorst

In “A Brilliant Commodity” (Oxford University Press), USC history and Jewish studies professor Saskia Coenen Snyder explores the diamond trade of the late 19th century and the critical role played by Jews at every level of an emerging international commodity market.

Mani Sockalingam stands in front a building.

Breakthrough Star Mani Sockalingam develops composite material systems that could benefit aerospace, automotive, defense sectors

May 17, 2023

Mani Sockalingam’s research supports the development of advanced composite material systems that could find application in the production of lightweight structures for the aerospace, automotive and defense sectors. He seeks to address fundamental scientific challenges at the intersection of materials-mechanics-manufacturing while mentoring students to conduct meaningful research.

Smokestacks by Thomas Cooper Library

Graduation with Leadership Distinction alumni look back on pathways to success

April 21, 2023, Hannah Cambre

The Center for Integrative and Experiential Learning is celebrating the Graduation with Leadership Distinction Program's tenth anniversary. Take a look at some of the earliest graduates with leadership distinction.